Woodburning & Other Crafts

    Woodburning, which is also known as pyrography, is the burning of designs on a surface. Not only do I woodburn on wood, but also on gourds.

 

    This is the top of an antler table made out of walnut. I burned a mountain scene with an elk on one end of the table and on the other end a head of an elk.

 

    This is one of my favorite scenes to woodburn, I have used it on several items.

                             

    I buy old paddles when I can find them and take off the old finish and then sand them slightly and woodburn patterns on both sides. On one side I burn the above scene with the mountains and the elk. On the other side I usually put a fish. I really like using the old paddles instead of new paddles because they have character to them, they usually have water stains, dings and cracks. Each paddle has its own history, you can just imagine all the different lakes, rivers and streams the paddles have seen.

                                                

              

 

 

    I keep an eye out for wooden plates. The scene woodburned on the plate below is the park in Olmsted Falls, Ohio. I also did this scene as a watercolor.       

                   

    I also woodburn on gourds. This really turns the gourds into works of art. Some of them I leave whole while others I either cut the top off and leave it as a top or I leave the top off altogether. This leaves the gourd as a bowl.

                           

    Joanne is a spinner and we bought a spinning wheel which I woodburned.

    I like to woodburn small pictures and frame them. The picture size of these is about 5 inches square. The overall size varies depending on the size of the frames. All the frames are solid wood.

 

 

 

                   

    One of my favorite types of projects is intarsia. Intarsia is the art of taking small pieces of wood and putting them together to make a picture. This fish picture is made of several woods. The background is made of ambrosia maple. The holes and long dark stains are made by the ambrosia bug. The border wood that makes a circle is apple wood which is very pretty. The outside frame is made of honey locust, a very hard and heavy wood. The fish and other parts of the inner picture are made of koa. Koa is grown in Hawaii, and highly figured koa is very expensive, but beautiful. In the fish itself I used wenge for the stripe and eye. I also used a real wooden lure to attract the fish.

 

 

For Prices and Available Art Call

Greg & Joanne Meyer

1-440-235-1327 or

  gmeyer47@sbcglobal.net

 

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